MAC OS Hacking

A Guide to Security Hardening for Apple Mac OS

MAC OS Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

This document covers numerous methods to harden Mac OS X, from both a local user and network perspective. It is primarily aimed at the single-user Macintosh client machine owned and used by a security conscious user. Its methods can be equally applied to a multi-user machine; however there are numerous additional security risks presented the moment a Mac OS X machine is made multi-user.

Hacking the Mac OS X Kernel for Unsupported Machines

MAC OS Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

When Apple originally released Mac OS X, it would not run on my trusty Power Macintosh 7300. The "public beta" had been able to run on the 7300.3 Sadly, the necessary drivers had been removed for the official release of Mac OS X. However, Apple had included those drivers in its open-source initiative (the Darwin operating system). Thus, it seemed as though it might be possible to resurrect Mac OS X on some unsupported systems by updating the drivers. It turned out that updating the missing drivers was not quite enough. There were additional problems in the Mac OS X kernel and kernel extensions which had to be worked around in one way or another. The techniques used in doing so provide useful case studies in taking advantage of the sophisticated Mac OS X device driver system (the IOKit system).

Mac OS X Hacking Tools

MAC OS Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

The Jargon File is a popular lexicographic resource amongst hackers (and nonhackers too). Although it might have some subjective definitions I may not agree with, I have conveniently quoted verbatim the definitions of the terms "hacker" and "tool" as a preface to the contents of this page. This page is a compendium of some programs you might come across while tinkering with Mac OS X. Documentation for most of these tools exists, therefore my aim is not to reproduce documentation, but simply to maintain a cache of relevant information. I believe this would be useful to those who are new to Mac OS X, but are interested in exploring the system at a low(er) level. Note that many of the tools listed here are ones that are either new to Mac OS X (as compared to Unix style systems), or are different from their Unix counterparts. In other words, I have avoided listing "standard" Unix/BSD tools.

Mac OS X Security Checklist

MAC OS Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

This document can be used as an audit reference, or as a system hardening document for Apple’s OS X operating system. This document is limited to versions 10.4.* of OS X. Security is complex and constantly changing. In addition to this checklist, consult any Apple Documentation and other sources for securing OS X that may help cover gaps in this document. See the Reference Section of this document for a list of additional resources.

Securing Mac OS X

MAC OS Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

This guide covers the security features of Mac OS X 10.4.2 as a multi-user networked system. Most of the console and network based security features are common between Mac OS X and Mac OS X Server, however this guide does not cover Server’s additional user, directory and network based security features. The reader should be familiar with using the UNIX command line and editing plain text configuration files. Most of the operations will require administrator access and it is recommended that each file be backed up before editing it.

Security in Mac OS X

MAC OS Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

Security has never been a more important consideration when selecting a computer platform. Whether you’re a home user with a broadband Internet connection, a professional with a mobile computer, or an IT manager with thousands of networked systems, you need to safeguard the confidentiality of information and the integrity of your computers. Apple is working to ensure that your Mac is safe and secure by implementing a security strategy that is central to the design of Mac OS X.