Ethical Hacking

Ethical Hacking

Ethical Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

Cyberspace is becoming an evermore dangerous place, especially to IT organizations that are charged with protecting sensitive data and maintaining web sites that generate revenue. Along with these dangers, studies show that internal threats are just as dangerous, particularly to applications that are readily accessible over intranets. Since locking down all networks is not a viable option, the only response that security managers can realistically execute is to harden their networks, applications and operating systems to a reasonable level of safety, and go on conducting business.

Ethical Hacking by Palmer

Ethical Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

The explosive growth of the Internet has brought many good things: electronic commerce, easy access to vast stores of reference material, collaborative computing, e-mail, and new avenues for advertising and information distribution, to name a few. As with most technological advances, there is also a dark side: criminal hackers. Governments, companies, and private citizens around the world are anxious to be a part of this revolution, but they are afraid that some hacker will break into their Web server and replace their logo with pornography, read their e-mail, steal their credit card number from an on-line shopping site, or implant software that will secretly transmit their organization’s secrets to the open Internet. With these concerns and others, the ethical hacker can help. This paper describes ethical hackers: their skills, their attitudes, and how they go about helping their customers find and plug up security holes. The ethical hacking process is explained, along with many of the problems that the Global Security Analysis Lab has seen during its early years of ethical hacking for IBM clients.

Ethical Hacking Techniques to Audit and Secure Web-Enabled Applications

Ethical Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

As public and private organizations migrate more of their critical functions to the Internet, criminals have more opportunity and incentive to gain access to sensitive information through the Web application. Gartner Group estimates that 75 percent of Web site hacks that occur today happen at the application level and this number is expected to increase. Hackers target the web application because it easily provides access to the most valuable business assets, such as employee and customer data (like health records and credit card information) as well as corporate proprietary information. While most web sites are heavily secured at the network level with firewalls and encryption tools, these sites still allow hackers complete access to the enterprise through web application manipulation.

Footprinting and Hacking: An Analysis of Current Methodology

Ethical Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers Footprinting

Hacking has become a significant threat to networks exposed to the Internet. In order to prevent systems from being hacked, the methods used by hackers must be well understood. Hackers begin by selecting and footprinting a target network. Once the target network is mapped, hackers proceed to map vulnerabilities and gain access by cracking passwords, using stack-smashing attacks, or spoofing the IP address of trusted machines. Hackers can then sniff internal network traffic or find other hosts that contain vital company secrets. Finally, a hacker can clean up system logs in order to conceal the fact that an attack occurred. In this paper we explain how each of these attack techniques is carried out.

Introduction to Ethical Hacking

Ethical Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

This book is about hacking ethically - the science of testing your computers and network for security vulnerabilities and plugging the holes you find before the bad guys get a chance to exploit them. Although ethical is an often overused and misunderstood word, the Merriam- Webster dictionary defines ethical perfectly for the context of this book and the professional security testing techniques that I cover - that is, conforming to accepted professional standards of conduct. IT practitioners are obligated to perform all the tests covered in this book aboveboard and only after permission has been obtained by the owner(s) of the systems - hence the disclaimer in the introduction.

Open-Source Security Testing Methodology Manual (OSSTMM)

Ethical Hacking Internet Security Whitepapers

ISECOM, the Institute for Security and Open Methodologies, registered in New York of the United States of America and in Catalunya, Spain as a Non-Profit Organization, is releasing the next update of the Open Source Security Testing Methodology Manual. This manual has been developed for free use and free dissemination under the auspices of the international, open-source community. This manual is designed to exceed international legislation and regulations regarding security as well as those from many participating organizations to assure compliancy. Financing for this manual and all ISECOM projects has been provided independent of commercial and governmental influence through ISECOM partnerships, subscriptions, certifications, licensing, and case-study-based research.