Cyber Warfare and Terrorism

Computer Attack and Cyber Terrorism: Vulnerabilities and Policy Issues for Congress

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

Many Pentagon officials reportedly believe that future adversaries may be unwilling to array conventional forces against U.S. troops, and instead may resort to "asymmetric warfare",where a less powerful opponent uses other strategies to offset and negate U.S. technological superiority. Also, partly because the U.S. military relies significantly on the civilian information infrastructure, these officials believe that future conflictsmaybe characterized bya blurring in distinction between civilian and military targets. As a consequence, they believe that government and civilian computers and information systems are increasingly becoming a viable target for opponents of the U.S., including international terrorist groups.

Cyber Operations and Cyber Terrorism

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

This informational document supplements the basic terrorism handbook and supports operational missions, institutional training, and professional military education for U.S. military forces in the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). This document provides an introduction to Cyber Terrorism, and addresses the history of the phenomena, how terrorist organizations recruit, the motivations behind use of the tactic, characteristics of Cyber Terrorism, and the types of attacks against networks. Finally, the handbook addresses specific threats to military forces.

Cyberterrorism

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

Cyberterrorism presents a hazardous threat to our increasingly digital world. The possibility of a major cyberterrorism attack in the United States would threaten infrastructure, financial systems, and everyday computing across the nation and here in Western Washington. Even more limited cyber infringement actions can disrupt the lifestyle of Central Puget Region residents and the daily activities of public, private, and nonprofit sector business and organizations, leading to potentially costly outcomes.

Cyberterrorism Threat

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

The last decade of the 20th Century has seen the rising concern over a new form of conflict, usually referred to as information warfare. As the US and other nations race forward into an information age, reliance on advanced information systems and infrastructures has grown significantly. Cyberspace has become a new realm for the exchange of digital information to conduct commerce, provide entertainment, pursue education, and a wide range of other activities. Information systems, in particular computer software and hardware, now serve as both weapons and targets of warfare. The possibility of warfare in cyberspace presents opportunity but also involves significant new security risks. As the world's leading military power and the society most reliant on its information systems and infrastructures, the US may well face adversaries searching to find new weaknesses. These adversaries may include terrorists.

Cyberterrorism: How Real Is the Threat?

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

The threat posed by cyberterrorism has grabbed the attention of the mass media, the security community, and the information technology (IT) industry. Journalists, politicians, and experts in a variety of fields have popularized a scenario in which sophisticated cyberterrorists electronically break into computers that control dams or air traffic control systems, wreaking havoc and endangering not only millions of lives but national security itself. And yet, despite all the gloomy predictions of a cyber-generated doomsday, no single instance of real cyberterrorism has been recorded.

Cyberterrorism: The Bloodless War?

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

The threat of terrorist attacks against U.S. citizens and U.S. interests around the world has become the nation’s most pressing national security issue. This aggression may include cyber attacks by the terrorists themselves or by targeted nation nation-states. Even more likely are cyber attacks by sympathizers of the terrorists, hackers with general anti-US or anti-allied sentiments, or thrill-seekers with no particular political motivation.

Jihadis and the Internet

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

Jihadi terrorists and radicals (jihadis) make significant use of the Internet as a resource. One of the consequences is that the Internet is an important platform for radicalisation and can even serve as a virtual training camp. Jihadis not only use of the Imternet as a resource, however, but can also attack the Internet itself with terrorist activities (the Internet as a target) or use the Internet against other targets (the Internet as a weapon). It is essential to gain insight into these forms of Internet usage for the purpose of the counter-strategies as well as security issues. This in-depth study "Jihadis and the Internet" provides that insight.

Symantec Cyberterrorism

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

The term cyberterrorism is becoming increasingly common in the popular culture, yet a solid definition of the word seems hard to come by. While the phrase is loosely defined, there is a large amount of subjectivity in what exactly constitutes cyberterrorism. In the aftermath of the September 11th attacks, this is somewhat disconcerting.

Terror's Digital Jihad

Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Internet Security Whitepapers

Globalization and the Internet are accelerating terrorist activity and their quest for digital jihad. Terrorists use the Internet to achieve many of their objectives. The Internet allows small groups of nonstate foes to finance, plan, supply, and execute terrorist operations globally with little regard to borders, laws, and governments.